Tag Archives: Tainan City

Post-Disaster Tainan City In Mourning

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The collapsed Wei-guan Golden Dragon building.

In the early morning hours (3:57 am local time) of Saturday, February 6, 2016, a magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck near the northern Kaohsiung City community of Meinong District. Although the quake was strong, the area surrounding Meinong did not sustain much damage. About 35 kilometers away in the Yong-kang Distict of Tainan City in Southern Taiwan, most people were asleep and ready to celebrate the Lunar New Year holiday.  The almost 2 million people of Tainan City were abruptly awakened by a massive earthquake that subsided in about 30 seconds. There was a brief aftershock. The quake was felt all over the island of Taiwan and as far away as Mainland China.

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A tall crane lifts a rescue team into the rubble to find survivors.

However, one community was shaken the hardest. It was in Yong-kang District of Tainan City, where the 17-story Wei-guan Golden Dragon building inexplicably collapsed. It was a large building with 4 floors of commercial space and 13 floors of residential apartments. The residents were mostly families and college students.

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Rescue teams from all over Taiwan and Japan searched the disaster site around the clock for a week.

An English teacher who lived in down the street rushed to the devastated Wei-guan scene, because he had dropped off his two sons at the complex the night before. He arrived before the dust settled, and before the police and emergency crews arrived. He waited nervously for any signs of survivors. When rescuers arrived at the scene, his ex-wife was the first survivor to pulled out of the wreckage in front of the glare of television cameras. Her 10-day old baby did not survive the collapse, and her husband died trying to protect both of them. The teacher begged the rescue workers to keep searching the dangerous ruins of his ex-wife’s apartment, but to no avail, his two sons were not found.

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Mayor William Lai worked tirelessly during rescue efforts to support the rescue crews and the victims’ families.

This personal tragedy was just one of many that unfolded over the next 7 days, with many parents losing their children and some children losing their parents. One-hundred-sixteen people died and more than 500 people were hospitalized in Tainan City. People waited days on end as the rescue efforts were carried out meticulously around the clock by professional teams during the first 100 hours. Their anxiety turned to grief, as the critical time for survival passed, and Tainan City Mayor William Lai (賴清德) made the difficult decision to bulldoze the wreckage to find the bodies deeper in the ruins.

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The Taiwanese flag flies at half mast at Jing-sing Hall at the Tainan City Mortuary Service Office, site of the mass memorial services.

Trained rescue teams, including rescue dogs, military personnel, police, paramedics and medical teams manned stations around the disaster site, and coordinated their efforts very efficiently and professionally with the local authorities. Volunteers from Taiwanese organizations, especially the Buddhist Compassion Relief Tzu Chi Foundation, organized supplies and support services to the small army of rescue workers and victims’ families during the weeklong rescue operations. The Tzu Chi volunteers were the first ones to arrive on the scene to provide relief support, and the last ones to leave, cleaning the area, and recycling the waste. A wave of foreign and Taiwanese media descended on the area, and were treated to gracious hospitality by volunteers and local residents who opened up their homes to the visitors. It was noticeable that the disaster brought out the best in the people of the community.

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Volunteers and family members pray and chant for the victims of the Tainan City earthquake.

On Friday, February 12th, mass funeral services were opened to help the community grieve for the 116 people who lost their lives in Tainan City. Family members, volunteers and officials joined the memorial service at the Mortuary Service Office in Tainan City in Jing-sing Hall. In attendance were Taiwan President Ma, Ying-jeou (馬英九), Taiwan President-elect Tsai, Ing-wen (蔡英文), Tainan City Mayor William Lai, and Kaohsiung City Mayor Chen Chu (陳菊). According to Taiwanese tradition, the souls of the deceased return home after seven days, so family members must provide them with food and blessings to take to heaven.

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Buddhist monks chant to calm the spirits of the deceased and guide them home, before they proceed to heaven.

Survivors and the victims’ family members are picking up the pieces to rebuild their lives. Generous donations from Taiwan and other countries are making their way to Tainan City to make the process a little easier. However, for most families, no amount of money can replace what was lost during the Lunar New Year holiday of 2016. It will take time for the victims’ families to find closure, and they are still seeking answers to the cause of the collapse. Currently, the builders of the Wei-guan Golden Dragon building have been arrested while they are being investigated by Tainan City prosecutors for substandard construction practices. Also, it was discovered that a landlord tore down supporting walls and beams on the first few floors of the building to rent the space to a large electronics retail store.

Around Taiwan, people are seeking answers and trying to learn from the lessons provided by this disaster. Many living in high rises are anxious and feel uneasy about when and where the next earthquake will hit. More people may choose to avoid living in high rises in Taiwan, but in many cities, finding alternate housing my not be an option. The owner of a reputable construction company Tainan City provided several factors to consider when people want to make the safest choices for high rise apartments in Taiwan. First, choose to live in a building that was built after 1999, when the government’s building regulations were strengthened after the notorious 9/21 earthquake. Second, choose a building where there is not retail space on the lower floors.

Taiwanese collection of priceless violins to make a homage visit to Cremona, Italy

Wen-Long Hsu presents a violin to Carlo Chiesa.

Wen-Long Hsu presents a violin to Carlo Chiesa.

On September 18, during a ceremony at the Chi Mei Museum in Tainan City, Taiwan, a collection of violins were displayed to the media and given a suitable sendoff by their caretakers before embarking on their journey to the Cremona Violin Museum in northern Italy. The heads of the Chi Mei Museum and the Chi Mei Culture Foundation attended the event. A string quartet performed on the antique instruments to set the mood for the occasion before a few notable speakers explained the significance of the collection’s return to their birthplace in Italy. The speeches stirred the audience, but the stars of the ceremony were the twenty-two priceless violins on display, which were famous Italian pieces produced in Cremona from the 1600’s and 1700’s.

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A string quartet performed classical music on priceless violins from the Chi Mei Museum collection.

Wen-Long Hsu (許文龍), founder of the Chi Mei Museum recollected his childhood dream and reasons for collecting 1,350 valuable violins, violas and cellos, which date from 1566 to the 1700’s. After starting his collection in 1990, he has accumulated many of the best violins in the world. Mr. Hsu regularly shares his collection with violinists who dream of performing on them. As part of his ongoing commitment to share the culture with society, he has shared part of his collection with the Cremona Violin Museum for special exhibitions since 2005.

Carlo Chiesa, Curator of the Special Exhibition at the Cremona Violin Museum presented the historical significance of Cremona, Italy, home to the most famous violinmakers in the world. He explained that almost all of the musical instruments produced in Cremona have found their way to private collectors and museums all over the world, so the museum holds special exhibitions to bring the violins home to Cremona on a temporary basis. The Chi Mei Museum has provided part of its collection to Cremona Violin Museum since 2005, but this will be the first time that Chi Mei is the sole provider of violins for the special Italian exhibition. This occasion will also be the largest loan of violins ever made by Chi Mei Museum to another museum.

The collection of antique violins that will travel to Cremona, Italy.

The collection of antique violins that will travel to Cremona, Italy.

“I am here in Tainan because the Chi Mei collection is the most important collection in the world,” declared Chiesa, “What makes this occasion special is that Chi Mei Museum is providing the largest collection so far to Cremona Violin Museum for public study, play, and preservation.”

Traveling to Cremona, Italy with Carlo Chiesi and the collection will be a group of Chi Mei Museum directors and a camera team that will document the exhibition for a book and a short film. The special exhibition at the Cremona Violin Museum will open on September 21, 2013 and close on October 13, 2013.

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