Kindergarten graduation in Taiwan

Xander during one of his kindergarten graduation performances. His costume is a Scottish theme to match the dance and music he performed.

Xander during one of his kindergarten graduation performances. His costume is a Scottish theme to match the dance and music he performed.

Parents around the world love to watch their little boy or girl get acknowledgment for their accomplishments during their kindergarten graduation ceremony. It is fun to watch very cute kids take the stage with their classmates and teachers. But there is nowhere in the world where kindergarten graduation is taken to such a level of significance by the schools and the parents as it is in Taiwan.

In Taiwan, the birthrate os the second lowest in the world (behind only Japan), which means parents are having fewer children. Class sizes are shrinking and schools are closing. This means parents are spoiling their precious child more than ever, and the kindergartens and finding it more competitive than ever to attract new students. Concerned that parents in Taiwan are choosing to have fewer children because of economic considerations, the government subsidizes all or most of the cost of kindergarten in Taiwan.

Kindergartens in Taiwan teach basic education, including math, and “be-pe-me-fe,” the basic building blocks that teach children how to read and write Traditional Chinese language. They also learn Taiwanese, because of a government mandate to help preserve the language nationally. Because of this mandate, kindergartens are not allowed to teach English, but many choose to do so “unofficially.” Children also get physical education, and a good dose of playtime. Nap time is an important part of kindergarten, and there are 3 years of kindergarten. The first two years are practically daycare services, as most parents work and need a place to drop off their little ones.

There are different levels of kindergarten. Some are attached to public schools and many are private schools. Some private schools still give out corporal punishment to the kids. For example, they may get a swat on the back of the hand if they forget their homework. Some schools offer specialized classes such as art, music, dance and rollerblading. Some even have piano or violin classes. It depend on the which area the kindergarten serves.

Xander performs during the Scottish routine.

Xander performs during the Scottish routine.

The graduation ceremony, marking the conclusion of 3 years of attendance at the kindergarten, is prepared for well in advance. Schools purchase cute costumes, create set designs, arrange choreography and start training the students a few months before the big day. With all of the parents, their relatives and friends in attendance, kindergartens must rent large auditoriums from a junior high or high school. It is a chance for the school to show the parents that their tuitions were put to good use. It is also a time when they can show off to the community, and attract new students. It is the biggest marketing opportunity that the schools have.

I experienced the kindergarten ceremony with my first son, and recently with my second son Xander. It was very cute and memorable. It is a great acknowledgment for them and a memorable way to send the children off to bigger and better challenges in elementary school, where singing and dancing are no longer part of the curriculum.

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2 responses to “Kindergarten graduation in Taiwan

  1. Xander and the other students are adorable. Thank you for sharing the ceremony and background info with us!

  2. Appreciate you sharing the ceremony with us through words and pictures.

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